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> Planes in the Romanian aviation in 1925
Alexandru C.
Posted: January 04, 2013 11:46 am
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Please help me to identify the types of aircraft/engine which entered into the Romanian aviation equipment in 1925. With approximation of course. I have a half wooden propeller and I try to find from what plane comes. Discussing on woodenpropeller forum, I got the information that is a French Levasseur propeller produced in 1925, according to the code on it. It also seems (not sure) that is not a French aircraft.
I made a list with planes – engines (the engine is important too), please help to correct it and add new items (from civil aviation too).
-Spad 61 - Lorraine-Dietrich ?
-Breguet 14 ? - Renault
-Breguet 19 - Hispano-Suiza , (or Renault 12K or Lorraine 12 engines ?)
-MS 35 – Gnome-Rhone
-Potez 25 - Lorraine-Dietrich
-Potez 15 - Lorraine-Dietrich
-Fokker DXI – Hispano Suiza ?
-Proto 2 - only in 1924 ?
-Morane Saulnier 129 - Hispano-Suiza engine ?

Any information or advice are welcome.
Many thanks,
Alexandru
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Radub
Posted: January 04, 2013 12:09 pm
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Do you have a photo?
It may be from a Potez 25.
Radu
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Alexandru C.
Posted: January 04, 2013 03:42 pm
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Here is the photo:
http://img5.imageshack.us/img5/8423/64514575.jpg
Maybe, maybe :)
Alexandru
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horia
Posted: January 04, 2013 05:53 pm
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Potez 25 use to have a RATIER 394 propeller but looks different from what you post. See the attach image for comparison.
(IMG:http://i.minus.com/jq1Ukq9xndQjB.jpg)
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Alexandru C.
Posted: January 04, 2013 07:36 pm
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Thank you for posting! Yes, the propeller cut looks more like that of the MS 35. You have a nice picture in your album :)
http://www.airliners.net/photo/Romania---A...13bdb0295fe5898
But I do not see the elliptical shape hole on the blade.
Can you tell me, MS 35 was manufactured at IAR Brasov beginning with 1925?
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horia
Posted: January 04, 2013 07:53 pm
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Could be MoS-35. Production start in 1927 at IAR plant.

(IMG:http://i.minus.com/jAIEFrxZCaojT.jpg)
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Dénes
Posted: January 05, 2013 08:01 am
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QUOTE (Alexandru C. @ January 05, 2013 01:36 am)
But I do not see the elliptical shape hole on the blade.

I have never seen a hole in any propeller. I believe that was done after the propeller was removed from the airplane.

Gen. Dénes
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horia
Posted: January 05, 2013 08:39 am
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That's because the propeller was intend to be used on a grave maybe.
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Alexandru C.
Posted: January 05, 2013 01:52 pm
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Hmm, I think Horia is right, it was created like a photo frame...
Here is the back side
http://img841.imageshack.us/img841/733/foto7fs.jpg
Many thanks.
Alexandru
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horia
Posted: January 06, 2013 11:48 am
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Hmm. Looks also like a Nieuport propeller.

(IMG:http://i.minus.com/j9oLCwpwUyEz1.jpg)
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Ferdinand
Posted: January 07, 2013 09:50 am
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not 100% same model....but great chance to be from this plane.

(IMG:http://i.minus.com/j963fwd0Amwml.jpg)
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Alexandru C.
Posted: January 07, 2013 10:14 am
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Yes, looks like well but I think it's an old Nieuport, from the first world war. As far as I know around the year 1925 Nieuport fighters were no more imported (my propeller was produced in 1925).
Thanks,
Alexandru
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Florin
Posted: January 08, 2013 04:13 pm
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QUOTE (horia @ January 06, 2013 06:48 am)
Hmm. Looks also like a Nieuport propeller.

(IMG:http://i.minus.com/j9oLCwpwUyEz1.jpg)

I guess this propeller got the hole AFTER its aviation career was over.
This means, when it was ready to be hanged on wall between two deer trophies.

P.S: Considering the big loss in aerodynamic efficiency and power traction incurred in propeller by such a hole, the only logic (if any) to use the holes during flight would be in an airplane with no synchronization of speed of machine gun fire with engine revolution. The holes would reduce the probability of bullets passing through propeller, but it would not reduce it to zero. And if the bullet would touch what was left of propeller, it would break it, get that tip of helix loose, then lose the equilibration, starting vibrating like crazy.
Due to these considerations, what they did for airplanes with no synchronization of speed of machine gun fire with engine revolution was to attach steel plates on the wooden propeller, the obvious solution instead punching holes.


This post has been edited by Florin on January 08, 2013 04:57 pm
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Victor
Posted: January 08, 2013 05:40 pm
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QUOTE (Florin @ January 08, 2013 06:13 pm)
Due to these considerations, what they did for airplanes with no synchronization of speed of machine gun fire with engine revolution was to attach steel plates on the wooden propeller, the obvious solution instead punching holes.

The Nieuport without synchronized machine-gun used a Lewis machine-gun mounted on top of the upper wings, firing over the propeller.
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Florin
Posted: January 08, 2013 08:06 pm
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QUOTE (Victor @ January 08, 2013 12:40 pm)
QUOTE (Florin @ January 08, 2013 06:13 pm)
Due to these considerations, what they did for airplanes with no synchronization of speed of machine gun fire with engine revolution was to attach steel plates on the wooden propeller, the obvious solution instead punching holes.

The Nieuport without synchronized machine-gun used a Lewis machine-gun mounted on top of the upper wings, firing over the propeller.

So, this confirm that the hole has nothing to do with aviation related matters.
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