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> Wallachians in Slovakia
21 inf
Posted: August 03, 2012 05:20 am
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A rather amusing situation I experienced in June this year. I was in France and speaking with my driver in English, I was amazed when he asked me, in a quite bad Romanian: "Aveţi vară īn Romānia?" I asked him how did he learned Romanian and he said he is vlah from Serbia. "Ah, so you are Romanian" I said to him. "No", the answer came, "I am a Vlah and I dont like to be called Romanian. I had nothing in common with Romanians".

Knowing a little bit about vlah dialect, I tried to speak little in oficial Romanian language and accent to him, but he claimed he didnt understand. The situation changed when I spoke to him with romanian transylvanian accent: he didnt understand the word "degete" (fingers), but he understand the word "jejichie", which is the romanian transylvanian peasant pronounciation, which is almost similar as vlah pronounce it "joajichie". Some other words had the same effect :)

Anyway, I am interested to know more about romanians (wallachians) in Slovakia and Czech Republic in Middle Ages.
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muggs
Posted: August 03, 2012 06:48 am
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Quite an interesting subject, thanks for all the links.
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Radub
Posted: August 03, 2012 09:17 am
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You must NOT forget that "borders", "passports", "visas", "travel denial" are relatively new concepts. Less than 150 years ago, people were able to move with more ease and populations shifted across Europe.
"Borders" as we understand them today are also relatively new concepts and even they changed many many times in the last 100 years. People found themselves belonging to different "countries" without moving home.

See this: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/05/16/e..._n_1520724.html

Radu
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21 inf
Posted: August 03, 2012 10:19 am
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Probably back in Middle Age were not the same borders as we know today, but there were strict laws regarding people movements.

LE: the laws in Middle Age included what was called in romanian language "legarea de pămānt" regarding serfs (iobagi). Passports existed also in late Middle Age. One could not pass a border legally if he didnt had a passport aproved by authorities. Also, property was very well defined with documents and even sheperds had to deal every year with the owners of the mountains in order to go there with their herds.

And, with all the respect, the link posted above was made at least by a "sfertodoct" (I dont know the term in english).

This post has been edited by 21 inf on August 03, 2012 05:40 pm
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Radub
Posted: August 04, 2012 10:17 am
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Yet, people moved. Apparently, Wallachians even managed to move as far as Slovakia.
Radu
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