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> Axis Paratroopers fotos, Some Rare images of Hungarian Paras
Alexei2102
Posted: September 23, 2011 09:40 am
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Alexei2102
Posted: September 23, 2011 09:41 am
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Dénes
Posted: September 23, 2011 07:06 pm
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Nice ones, indeed.

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MMM
  Posted: September 25, 2011 02:00 pm
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They sure are! Where are they from?
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Florin
Posted: September 25, 2011 03:24 pm
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Are they Hungarian? The symbol on the tail of Ju-52 reminds me of some Hungarian planes.
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Alexei2102
Posted: September 26, 2011 10:04 am
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They are 100% Hungarian, of course.
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Florin
Posted: September 27, 2011 03:16 am
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QUOTE (Alexei2102 @ September 26, 2011 05:04 am)
They are 100% Hungarian, of course.

Did they took part in any notable action, with some clear achievements on their own, anywhere in Russia or later in Transylvania?
I am just curious. Many small countries (that includes Romania, Poland, Holland etc.) had little units of paratroopers.
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MMM
Posted: September 28, 2011 01:36 pm
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A good book that has a chapter about the Romanian Para's:
TĂNASE, Mircea – Trupele aeropurtate în cel de-al doilea război mondial, Bucureşti, Editura Militară, 2006
Airborne troops of WW2
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Alexei2102
Posted: September 28, 2011 02:42 pm
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MMM
  Posted: September 28, 2011 02:46 pm
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Oh, I see now... You got the pics, I got the book; where are the Paratroopers?
(Hint: Tralalabad...)
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Alanmccoubrey
Posted: September 29, 2011 07:07 pm
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QUOTE (Florin @ September 25, 2011 03:24 pm)
Are they Hungarian? The symbol on the tail of Ju-52 reminds me of some Hungarian planes.

What JU-52 ? That is an SM-75.

This post has been edited by Alanmccoubrey on September 29, 2011 07:08 pm
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Ertogrul
Posted: October 01, 2011 09:14 am
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Italy exported five SM.75 aircraft to Hungary for service with the Hungarian airline MALERT. After Hungary entered World War II, these aircraft were pressed into service with the Magyar Kiràlyi Honvéd Légiero (MKHL), Hungarian Air Force. During the short conflict against Yugoslavia, in the afternoon of 12 April 1941, four SM.75s, loaded with paratroopers, took off from Veszprém. Unfortunately, the leading aircraft, code E-101, crashed immediately afterwards. Twenty three Hungarians lost their lives, including 19 paratroopers. It was the heaviest loss in the war against Yugoslavia. On 6 May 1941, the Hungarian Air Force had at its disposal four S.M.75, as paratroop transport.
source: Wikipedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Savoia-Marchetti_SM.75
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Florin
Posted: October 02, 2011 09:01 pm
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QUOTE (Ertogrul @ October 01, 2011 04:14 am)
Italy exported five SM.75 aircraft to Hungary for service with the Hungarian airline MALERT. After Hungary entered World War II, these aircraft were pressed into service with the Magyar Kiràlyi Honvéd Légiero (MKHL), Hungarian Air Force. During the short conflict against Yugoslavia, in the afternoon of 12 April 1941, four SM.75s, loaded with paratroopers, took off from Veszprém. Unfortunately, the leading aircraft, code E-101, crashed immediately afterwards. Twenty three Hungarians lost their lives, including 19 paratroopers. It was the heaviest loss in the war against Yugoslavia. On 6 May 1941, the Hungarian Air Force had at its disposal four S.M.75, as paratroop transport.
.............................

This is answering my question. Thank you.
The following link...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Airborne_forces

...is presenting airborne operations from all sides (Axis, the Western Allies, Soviet Union) and is complementing your information, because in this Web link the Hungarian paratroopers were forgotten.
An additional link only about the Japanese paratroopers:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japanese_mari...of_World_War_II

In my opinion, their most important achievement was capturing oil refineries in Sumatra, preventing their destruction by the Dutch operators.

This post has been edited by Florin on October 02, 2011 09:03 pm
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