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> Translation from German required, please., In memorium card
Tyke
Posted: January 14, 2009 11:04 pm
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Fruntas
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Can a helpful member please volunteer to provide me with a translation into English from a German text?

I have just added this "in memorium card" to my collection.
(IMG:http://img175.imageshack.us/img175/3212/deathcardbw9.jpg)
(IMG:http://img175.imageshack.us/img175/deathcardbw9.jpg/1/w398.png)

Apart from having very little knowlege of German, I have a problem with the Gothic script used on the card.

I can understand that the subject of the card (rest in peace) was a soldier in the 4th company of the 28th Infantry Regiment who was killed in Romania, on 9 August 1917, at Marasesti. Is Marasesti correct? I think the date would fit with that battle.

Thanks in anticipation.

Alan in Bradford
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21 inf
Posted: January 15, 2009 04:16 am
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General de corp de armata
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100% correct it is Mărăşeşti.
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Cantacuzino
Posted: January 15, 2009 04:39 am
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28 Lebenjahre = 28 years old
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Radub
Posted: January 15, 2009 09:32 am
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There are some on-line translation services. I like this http://babelfish.yahoo.com/
Not perfect, but a good start. ;)
Radu
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dead-cat
Posted: January 16, 2009 05:25 am
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the text:

In Christian Remembrance for the virtous youngling
Nikolaus Keilhacker
servant in Höselsthal

Soldier of the 28th infantry regiment, 4th company
fallen on the field of honour, at
Marasesti in Romania, on August 9th 1917
at the age of 28.


filled with courage you went to war,
filled with hope to return,
but the Lord has chosen different,
and enlisted you in the army of heavens.

Sweet Heart of Jesus, be my love!
(300 days indulgence)
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Dénes
Posted: January 16, 2009 06:51 am
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Dead-cat, it's only me, or the text contains the letter 's' in both old and new style of writing? Like in the name 'Maraselsti'?

Gen. Dénes
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dead-cat
Posted: January 16, 2009 12:16 pm
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as far i know, both "s" are valid in the gothic script and i imagine having seen both in a prayer book from about 1780.
i belive there is even a rule when each is to be used. the one looking like "f" is supposed to be a long "s", while the regular "s" is being used as "short s", chiefly in one-syllabe words.
if i'm not entirely mistaken, the diffrence stems from the "old" ortography (pre 20th century).
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Radub
Posted: January 16, 2009 12:24 pm
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The use of a long letter that looks like an "f" instead of "s" is also a feature of "Ye Olde English". Makes reading Chaucer or Shakespeare "in original" kind of difficult.
An explanation here http://www.askoxford.com/asktheexperts/faq...shioned?view=uk
Radu
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dead-cat
Posted: January 16, 2009 12:31 pm
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http://ora-web.swkk.de/digimo_online/digim...eigen&a_id=2113
on page 5 is an example of usage for both "s" variants in the original "dracula" monography, printed in 1488 at Nürnberg.

This post has been edited by dead-cat on January 16, 2009 12:32 pm
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Hadrian
Posted: January 16, 2009 12:45 pm
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Both variants were used, depending on word.

"s" simple is read as Z in romanian, "ss" and ß were S. in the new german ortography ß and the Umlaute disapeared.
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dead-cat
Posted: January 16, 2009 01:07 pm
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erm, no. the "new" german ortography does allow ss instead of ß (among other things) but it certainly neither eliminates the ß, nor the umlaut.
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Tyke
Posted: January 16, 2009 11:34 pm
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QUOTE (dead-cat @ January 16, 2009 05:25 am)
the text:

In Christian Remembrance.............


MANY thanks for ALL responses, but especially to dead-cat.

From - a very grateful - Alan
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