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> Bulgaria in ww2
Dani
Posted: September 08, 2005 07:08 am
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A quite old book:

http://books.stonebooks.com/cgi-bin/foxweb...eedback?1001725


Edited: Armistice agreement with Bulgaria:
http://www.yale.edu/lawweb/avalon/wwii/bulgaria.htm

This post has been edited by Dani on September 08, 2005 07:10 am
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Sturmpionier
Posted: September 08, 2005 08:58 am
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QUOTE (Iamandi @ Sep 8 2005, 06:47 AM)
Off topic:
Sturmpionier, can you give some links related to bulgarian military sites and/or forums dedicated to ww2? Preferable in english, if not in romanian... :)

Thanks in advance,

Iama

Here is the international forum of the bulgarian military history forum "Boina slava".Free to ask in english ;)

See also HERE

Best regards
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Kiwi
Posted: December 30, 2008 10:38 am
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Bulgaria was officially neutral and maintained diplomatic relations with Russia until the Soviets invaded in September 1940.

Because of it's neutrality, Japan did not object to Deutsch Luft Hansa Ju-290 flights between Bulgaria and Ningxia in China from May to September 1944.

If anyone can help me identify airfields used or dig up information for me please about Ju-290 flights to or from Bulgaria in 1944 I would greatly appreciate it.

Simon
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Petre
Posted: September 10, 2009 05:17 pm
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QUOTE
The Bulgarians … rendering aid to the fantastic voyage of the Rear-Admiral Zieb in his amazing escape from Romania.
The German naval commander had assembled everything that could float and was German or pro-German, and determined to make his way with this ramshackle flotilla of surviving Black Sea units and various military and commercial river craft, in all some 200 wildly heterogenous vessels. Zieb's unwieldy command made a procession 25 miles long, on to which were crammed 8,000 people, among them many civilians including women and children, and whose military elements included a penal battalion (which performed well after Zieb promised to destroy the criminal records of its members who did their duty). They had only one river pilot, a Greek who spoke no German, and no charts except for a tourist map of the Danube.
Nonetheless, they headed upriver on August 25th, having to fight their way past Cernavoda in a costly battle, and then bluff their way past Romanian 150-mm shore batteries guarding the beginning of the stretch of the river that formed the Romanian-Bulgarian border (Zieb did this by claiming that 200 Stukas were on the way to bomb the Romanian batteries if they resisted, despite the fact that there were nowhere near 200 German bombers in all of Romania at this time).
Despite the recent decision to disarm German units fleeing Romania, the Bulgarians in fact provided Zieb's little navy several days of respite. The Germans were able to stop at two places on the Bulgarian side of the river, at the first taking on needed supplies of drinking water, bread (a group of barges in Zieb's armada contained 2,000 tons of almonds and plums, so some food reserves were available), and especially coal, as many vessels had been reduced to burning wood in their boilers, thus managing a bare crawl through the water. At the second stop in Bulgaria, Zieb put ashore 300 women and children, as well as 700 wounded, mostly casualties from the fight at Cernavoda.
Zieb would endure more trials as he plowed up the Danube along the Romanian-Yugoslav border (172 vessels made it as far as Yugoslavia, but this was the end of the line, as the advancing Soviets already controlled the cataracts of the Danube known as the "Iron Gates" up ahead, and Zieb concluded his epic journey with a dangerous five-week (?) trek through Yugoslavia on foot). I cite his incredible story here as an example of aid rendered by the Bulgarians to the Germans as late as the end of August, despite the "official" position in Sofia. 
Mike Yaklich (BG?/USA?)


This post has been edited by Petre on September 10, 2009 05:19 pm
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Dénes
Posted: September 11, 2009 04:54 am
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Very interesting, and little known, story. Thanks for sharing.

Gen. Dénes
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Petre
Posted: October 12, 2015 08:25 am
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It is more about Romania ...
From the memory book of admiral N. Kuznetsov (Sov. Fleet CO WW2) „The Victorious advance”
[ ... ]
On sept. 3, the troops of the 3.Ukrainian Front reached the the romanian-bulgarian border.
Though Romania had withdrawn from the Nazi bloc, the reactionary Bulgarian government continued to pursue a pro-German policy ... they aided the Nazis ... the Soviet Government declared war on Bulgaria on Sept. 5.
According to Stavka instructions, the 3. Ukr. Front prepared to enter Bulgarian territory.
Stavka gave a special importance to the liberation of Bulgaria.
Marshal Gh. Jukov was to fly to the 3. Ukr. Front Headquarters. I was ordered to go with him. On board the airplane he told me he had a talk with G. Dimitrov. The latter assured him that there would not be any war with the bulgarians.
On Aug. 30, Marshal Jukov and I arrived at the 3.Ukr. Front Headquarters, situated in Feteşti, not far from Chernavodsky Bridge.
Marshal S.Timoshenko, the responsible person coordinating the actions of the 2. & 3. Ukr. Fronts, was here too.
I found the moment to go and look the Chernovodsky Bridge. Recently The Black Sea Fleet aircraft had made several attacks on it ... I have asked rear-admiral S. Belousov ( naval liason officer at the Front Headquarters ) to clarify the results of the bombings ... Its findings have been contradictory ...
The talk with F. Tolbukhin, CO of the 3. Ukr. Front was precise and practical ... he promised to inform me about the D-day when the decision from Stavka will be received.
Jukov remained in Feteşti while I left for Constantsa where the operative group of the Black Sea Fleet Staff (rear-admiral I. Azarov) had established there.
I remained in Constanta awaiting the signal from the Front Staff. On Sept. 7, I called Marshal Jukov by phone, but he still had no information on the D-day.
The Front Staff informed me only on Sept. 8 : "We are beginning."


This post has been edited by Petre on October 12, 2015 08:29 am
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Florin
Posted: October 13, 2015 01:59 am
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QUOTE (Petre @ October 12, 2015 03:25 am)
....................
Jukov remained in Feteşti while I left for Constantsa where the operative group of the Black Sea Fleet Staff (rear-admiral I. Azarov) had established there.
I remained in Constanta awaiting the signal from the Front Staff. On Sept. 7, I called Marshal Jukov by phone, but he still had no information on the D-day.
The Front Staff informed me only on Sept. 8 : "We are beginning."

What meant "D-Day" from the point of view of the Soviet high rank officers ?

I guess the invasion of Bulgaria.

This post has been edited by Florin on October 13, 2015 01:59 am
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Petre
Posted: October 13, 2015 09:25 am
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It is from the english version of the text, that I used for easy work.
From the rus. version - the begining of the actions.
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