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> New interesting album 1917 - Oituz valley, Bretcu (Bereck) - Poiana Sarata (Sosmez
ciprianhugianu
Posted: March 18, 2014 06:58 am
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New Album - pictures of Austro-Hungarian army in 1917, especially Of 70 Honved Regiment (commander: Sorsich Bela). Does anyone know how can I find some more information about this unit? Thanks a lot!
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Dénes
Posted: March 18, 2014 07:43 am
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Very nice album, indeed! Thanks for sharing.

Gen. Dénes
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ciprianhugianu
Posted: March 18, 2014 09:36 am
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You're welcome, Denes!
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ocoleanui
Posted: March 18, 2014 10:20 am
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Sure is 70 Honved Regiment ?Because down ,Bela Sorsich is CO of 70.Honvéd-Infanterie-Division !!

70.Honvéd-Infanterie-Division
Sep 15 - Aug 16 GM. Anton Goldbach
Aug 16 - May 18 FML. (GdI.) Béla Sorsich von Severin
May 18 - Nov 18 GM. Béla Berzeviczy von Berzevicze und Kakas-Lomnitz

http://www.austro-hungarian-army.co.uk/divcomd1.htm

Picture with Bela Sorsich :
http://www.austro-hungarian-army.co.uk/gallery/sorsich.htm[B][COLOR=red]
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Cantacuzino
Posted: March 18, 2014 01:03 pm
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Interesting the picture with the crashed plane Hansa Brandenburg near Bretcu village. Could be a romanian victory ? :P
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ciprianhugianu
Posted: March 18, 2014 01:45 pm
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Who knows, but thamks for telling me what kind of plane it was!
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Cantacuzino
Posted: March 19, 2014 01:35 pm
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ciprianhugianu
Posted: March 20, 2014 09:34 am
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Is 70.Honvéd-Infanterie-Division, no 70.Honvéd-Infanterie- Regiment, my apoologies!
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Florin
Posted: March 21, 2014 02:23 am
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7th photo, from top to bottom (in "My Album"):
The further truck seems to be of same type as the closest.
What I find really interesting is that the rear / traction wheels have no tire of any kind (this means, regardless if inflatable or non-inflatable).
These cast iron wheels resemble more with those installed on the agricultural equipment of those days.

John Dunlop invented the pneumatic tire in 1888. His basic job was veterinarian !
His invention was only for bicycles. (The legend says that the first were for the bicycle of his son.)
In 1895 André Michelin was the first person trying to use pneumatic tires on an automobile.
Philip Strauss invented the first successful tire in 1911.

This post has been edited by Florin on March 30, 2014 07:11 am
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Florin
Posted: March 30, 2014 07:45 am
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9th photo, from top to bottom:
Following basic logic, that armored vehicle had 4 machine guns (or at least 3, if the rear side was not protected). I am wondering if each machine gun has its own operator, or if the operator moved from one gun to another as needed. The maximum crew resulting as possible is 5 persons – quite big I would say.

On the Western Front, after the shock of facing the British tanks faded, the German used successfully a special rifle with bullets having hardened tip (I think they were 20 mm, maybe even smaller), able to penetrate through the weak armor of the first tanks.
You would not be surprised to learn that in the first tanks and armored cars the non-driving crew was standing. What is quite surprising is the fact that the designers kept it this way until close to WWII, when Guderian demanded for German designers to provide a seat for each crew member. Maybe the Soviet designers were implementing this on their own, but I don't have information about them. Following logic, I don't see how the crews in the ultrafast Soviet "BT" (max. 72 km/h on road, max. 50 km/h off road) could stand, keep equilibrium and perform their duty at that speed.

This post has been edited by Florin on March 30, 2014 05:48 pm
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